Can Stress Cause Autoimmune Disease?

  • Image of woman feeling stressed at work and information about how that will affect her autoimmune disease.

The link between stress and autoimmune disease is undeniable. Stress is known to generate autoimmune disease, to create a hostile environment where toxins contrive and to worsen the symptoms and severity of existing autoimmune disorder symptoms.

Not only can stress cause, perpetuate and intensify autoimmune diseases, but stress continues to build in the body as a patient suffers daily through the problems and fatigue caused by autoimmune disorders.

How can stress cause autoimmune disease?

When the body faces a stressful situation, it releases its evolutionary fight-or-flight response hormones. Unfortunately, most stressful confrontational experiences in day-to-day life are not true matters of survival as they were in earlier stages of human evolution. Yet the same extreme hormones are released to equip the body to fight or to fly. When neither fight nor flight is taking, the hormones stay in the body and create a toxic, unstable environment.

Image of couple arguing and in a stressful situation.

Cortisol and adrenaline are the body’s main stress hormones. Though necessary, an excess of either is extremely fatiguing to and detrimental to the body. Elevated cortisol is associated with elevated blood sugar levels, weakened immune systems, leaky gut syndrome, adrenal gland exhaustion, inflammation and amongst other symptoms, still, impaired internal healing.

Any of these symptoms caused by elevated cortisol cause the additional stress in the body, worsening the already present negative conditions. High blood sugar levels can lead to sugar cravings which can be toxic to stressed individuals; a weakened immune system fails to prevent infections or intruders; adrenal gland exhaustion means adrenalin cannot excrete when actually needed and as internal healing is impaired, current negative effects cannot be remedied.

The cyclical process of stress in and on the body is severe. The best way to combat stress is to look to its sources or origin. Let’s take a look at locating and eliminating stress in the body and life.

What can be done to limit stress in the body and overcome or prevent autoimmune disease?

First and foremost, stress is reduced by eliminating sources of stress in one’s life. This can include environmental factors like over-stimulating or extreme environments, foods that are causing stress as the body struggles to metabolize them or hormonal responses to emotional situations.

Removing stress is not a simple task.

Image of a woman medicating in her office trying to get rid off stress.It must chipped away diligently and thoughtfully, requiring patients to take the time to evaluate each potentially stressful aspect of their lives. Of course, the ideal, stress-free yogic dream is out of reach for many in our busy society. However, there are ways to make eliminations, to address issues one at a time and supplements that can support the reduction of physical stress. For example, magnesium has a relaxing effect on the nervous system. Absorbing magnesium in the body promotes more restful sleep, creating a healthier, more stable internal environment. Other ways to relieve stress include gentle exercise, time with loved ones, time with pets, massage, touching, and counseling.

If you suffer from autoimmune disease, it is worth evaluating what might be causing stress in your body.

Be it from work, overthinking, physical exertion, toxic relationships or dramatic conversations; stress can manifest in a physically harmful way in the body.

Take care of your health and immune system by detoxing your life and body and taking steps toward a calmer, slower pace of life. Our team at AMP Floracel is here to answer any questions you might have about a budding autoimmune disorder, a suspicion of abundant cortisol in the body or other indicators of harmful bodily stress. Reach out to us to get started on a healthier, stress-reduced regimen today.

By | 2018-04-16T11:27:16+00:00 April 16th, 2018|Autoimmune Disease, Stress|0 Comments